Equal Justice for All?

Walter Scott received five deadly shots in the back from Officer Michael Slager as Scott ran away from him after a traffic stop. After Mr. Scott lay dead, face down, Officer Slager tossed his taser at Mr. Scott’s side, bent down and handcuffed him. Unaware he was being filmed, Officer Slager said he shot Mr. Scott because Scott threatened him with his own taser and he feared for his life.

Watch the video. See for yourself.

Five shots in the back.

The jury was allowed to convict on several charges from murder to manslaughter. Yet…

The judge in the South Carolina case was forced to declare a mistrial because the jury, which consisted of one black male, six white men and five white women, could not reach a consensus. One juror, in a note to the judge, said he couldn’t vote for a conviction and wouldn’t change his mind.

Is there any wonder why Black Lives Matter exists? The evidence is clearly there. The mayor and police chief said Officer Slager lied; he was wrong. Does it matter why Mr. Scott ran? Was he a threat to Officer Slager? Did he deserve to die?

At some point we must admit just how cheap Black lives are. At some point, we must stand up and declare the need for equal justice for all.

Thankfully, the prosecutor will try Officer Slager again. Thankfully, she will not let the family of Walter Scott down. Will we?

15 comments

  1. It is a travesty.

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    1. It is, Susan. Good word for it. So many videos, so many lives.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I was shocked and dismayed that no consensus was reached in this trial. It is indeed a travesty. I am sorry that people, even when a video shows intent, cannot put something like this in perspective.

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    1. I agree, Andy. It is sad to me that one holdout juror could not be moved, would not see the value in a human life, refused to acknowledge the deadly sin one man committed against another child of God.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I wish I could be surprised by the outcome but yet again (and on video, without a doubt) justice does not prevail.

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    1. Quite frankly, I am appalled, Lilka. At least it has awakened public conversation in the news. Every broadcast I turned to this week had the same reaction. Perhaps a few eyes will finally be opened.
      I pray at his second trial, the judge will be wiser at his command of jurors and justice will prevail after all.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I pray so Susan. To watch the officer’s actions on the video and for him to not be found guilty is sickening.
        My prayer is that God’s justice will prevail and that He would comfort the family of deceased. I wish I could say I believe things will get better but we will just have to wait and see. Love to you!

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      2. Well, the good news is that he was not found not guilty – it was a mistrial because of one gentleman who had his mind made up before the trial ever began. The other eleven jurors definitely voted guilty, but told the judge they later they knew there was “something wrong” with the 12th juror, and knew they could not persuade him.
        The prosecutor intends to retry the case. We must all pray the new judge will have better eyes and ears on the jury selection process.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Also, I was recently pulled over in a small town because of my front headlight going out unbeknownst to me. I am a white mom in a minivan full of baby stuff. I am the least aggressive person I know and I have no record, not even a traffic record. I have to admit, that officer scared the tar out of me. His attitude felt provoking and he was certainly approaching with a very defensive tone in his attitude and body language. Now, I have the utmost respect for people in service and two police officers saved my life years ago. But, that night recently, as I sat in my minivan, I was actually afraid of this cop. It was disturbing and I am still disturbed. I prayed the whole time. He let me go with a warning to fix my headlight, but the entire interaction was unsettling. Something, somewhere needs to balance out, that is for sure.

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    1. I have had the same kind of experience. I’m a small woman (4’10”) and I have a general respect as well. Yet there have been one or two instances I have been extremely afraid, and they were both at night. It’s a very vulnerable feeling when you don’t know what you might do to set someone off.

      The system needs to change, that’s for sure.

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  5. Mr. Scott is running away and I immediately ask myself why shots were fired. He was running away. So, don’t you chase and handcuff and have back up on the way? How do you justify shooting someone in the back as they run off? The guy certainly did not look as if he was reaching for a weapon as he ran off. In fact, I felt as if that guy was the one who was scared.

    This made me sick. I just wanted to cry as I watched him fall to the ground, knowing that was the moment his life started leaving. And the handcuffs. Oh, my stars. I cannot even with that. You shoot a suspect that is obviously lifeless, wouldn’t you want to do SOMETHING to intervene? He is asking a dead guy to put his hands behind his back?!? Police are trained in CPR and assessment.

    You don’t shoot someone in the BACK, handcuff them as if they are still a threat, drop something in the grass, and you certainly don’t stand around like, “Hmm, what now?” while you wait for the sound of sirens or other officers to come along and start working. By the time the other people showed up and started assessing this guy, it was way, way TOO LATE!

    Come back Jesus. Just come back! The greed, the lust, the hate, the killings, the homeless, the sick, the depraved…I wish He would come back quickly.

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    1. Yes, I was incredulous that he handcuffed an obviously dead or dying man. Why wouldn’t he have begun CPR? It was horrifying to watch. There was no need to shoot; the level of violence far outweighed the situation. Every time I see something like this it hurts my heart. And I am certain it does not hurt me as much as it devastates the Black community.

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  6. Well said, Susan. It’s indeed a travesty of justice. I’m surprised the jury was approved. Don’t both lawyers have to approve a jury?

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    1. Yes, and ultimately, so does the judge. I don’t understand it. Hopefully in the retrial there will be more of a balance.

      Liked by 1 person

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